How Having a Healthy Gut Contributes to Weight Loss

May 22, 2019

Many people find it difficult (if not impossible) to lose weight and reason for the latter may not be visible. You see, It’s possible that the factor you are having such a hard time reducing weight is since the bacteria living inside your gut are out of balance.

Until recently, it was presumed that these bacteria (our microbiome) didn’t do much. Moreover, now there is a growing body of research suggesting that the 100 trillion germs – about three pounds – existing inside our gut play a huge role in our health and illness. Scientists believe that this is specifically true for the metabolic disease that pesters us today, such as obesity and diabetes. In many cases, improving gut health has similar effects to taking BCAA for weight loss https://atpscience.com/product/bcaa-211/ but on a much more holistic level.

How does the gut have anything to do with weight problems?

Exactly how the microbiome affects our weight isn’t known yet, but lots of researchers believe that it contributes to processing food and helps determine how many calories and nutrients are taken in.

It’s complicated, and we have much more to learn about this incredibly complicated system living inside us. We don’t have enough facts to make appropriate recommendations on weight-loss probiotic (live germs that are good for our health) supplements. There are many factors, and they relate in ways we do not know. Therefore, probiotic supplements that declare to aid weight reduction have not yet been proven.

One is that our dietary routines can have a remarkable influence on the mix of useful and harmful germs in our gut. In many cases, improving gut health has similar effects to taking BCAA for weight loss but on a much more holistic level is that our dietary routines can have a remarkable influence on the mix of useful and harmful germs in our gut.

Here are a few measures that you can start implementing to support a healthy gut:

Eat more fibre

Consuming fibrous plant foods is an essential method for enhancing the effectiveness of gut germs. These plants supply the raw material to feed the bacteria through a procedure called fermentation. The diversity and number of plants you consume will be reflected in the variety and number of germs in your gut. Strive for at least 20 grams of fibre a day; two to three portions of fruit, 4 to 6 servings of veggies, two to three parts of entire grains, nuts and beans several times a week.

Consume more fermented foods

 Fermented foods offer probiotics. Greek yogurt and kefir, a delicious dairy beverage that’s packed with good bugs, are a great start. Try to find products that say “live and active cultures” on the label, and shun those with added sugar that can feed unwanted bacteria.

Include prebiotic food in your diet

Prebiotics are a type of soluble fibre discovered in certain plant foods that act as “food” for probiotics. They resemble fertilizer assisting probiotics to thrive in your gut. Prebiotic-containing foods include garlic, asparagus, and banana.

As an alternative, you can also start considering the benefits of Gutright and other “modbiotic” supplements that supplies all the beneficial bacteria you need to maintain gut health.

Reduce your consumption of meat

A high animal protein diet feeds a kind of bacteria called Biophilia that has been known to cause inflammation according to research studies. Persistent inflammation is a significant factor in obesity.

While there is nothing wrong with having some meat in your meal, you can start thinking of it as a dressing and not the main course. Ideally, at least 3/4 of your meal ought to be comprised of vegetables.

Skip the sugar

Sugar feeds the unwanted gut germs and triggers them to prosper. Research studies have shown that a diet plan high in sugar can cause an overgrowth of yeast species and other pathogenic microbes. For the beneficial bacteria to grow, they require complex carbs like vegetables, beans, and whole grains – not sugar.